Do you take Plavix?

http://www.fiercepharma.com/story/bristol-myers-sanofi-catch-break-plavix-marketing-case/2015-08-25

U.S. District Judge Freda Wolfson partially dismissed claims from Elisa Dickson, a former Sanofi-Aventis sales rep, who alleged that the company told her to falsely promote Plavix to docs. Dickson said she was instructed to promote the drug as better than aspirin for stroke patients, for example, even though trial data showed the drug was not effective for that population. And Sanofi allegedly told Dickson to focus her Plavix sales calls on docs whose patients were mainly covered by Medicare or Medicaid, The New Jersey Law Journal reports…

Wolfson also rejected Dickson’s claims that Plavix was only put on lists of approved drugs for each state’s Medicaid program based on misleading information…

The positive ruling deals a shot of good news to the companies, which have encountered other pushback over Plavix marketing. In 2013, the Department of Justice (DoJ) said it would probe disclosures to the FDA about the med’s effectiveness in certain patients. And two U.S. state attorneys general have alleged in other suits that Bristol-Myers and Sanofi knew–or should have known–since 2003 that some patients don’t get Plavix’s full benefits.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/10/10/plavix-health-risks.aspx

How in the world can anyone justify the use of a drug that increases your risk of death, and costs 33 to 200 times more than the most common alternative, and to top it all off, call it prevention? It’s really amazing how Bristol-Meyers has managed to pull the wool over everyone’s eyes on this one. Even if you take Plavix alone, without aspirin, you’re still likely wasting huge amounts of money, and, as the new evidence suggests, taking a higher health risk than you would with low-dose aspirin…

In 2000, one of the best articles I’ve ever read documenting the tragedy of the traditional medical paradigm was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The author was Dr. Barbara Starfield of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Based on her article, I created a headline that has reverberated through the web ever since: Doctors Are The Third Leading Cause of Death in the US. Dr. Starfield’s research documented how a staggering 225,000 Americans die from iatrogenic causes, i.e. their death is caused by a physician’s activity, manner, or therapy…

http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/plavix

Common Side Effects of Plavix:

Itching
Eczema
Rash
Head or joint pain
Bruising
Diarrhea
Fever
Skin redness
Taste problems

Serious Side Effects of Plavix:

Stop taking Plavix and contact your doctor if you experience any of the following side effects:

Nosebleed
Bloody or tarry stools
Blood in your urine
Coughing up blood
Vomiting that looks like coffee grounds
Crushing heavy chest pain that spreads to arm, shoulder, or jaw
Sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of your body
Sudden headache
Confusion
Vision, speech, or balance problems
Weakness
Fever
Pale skin or yellowing of the skin or eyes
Purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin
Unusual bleeding in the mouth, vagina, or rectum

Get emergency help if you exhibit the following signs of an allergic reaction to Plavix:

Hives
Difficulty breathing
Swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat

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How much more does the U.S. pay for drugs? Up to 10 times more, report says

http://www.fiercepharma.com/story/how-much-more-does-us-pay-drugs-10-times-more-report-says/2015-09-28

But more commonly used meds also showed dramatic pricing disparities, including Eli Lilly’s depression fighter Cymbalta and AstraZeneca’s acid reflux pill Nexium. Cymbalta costs $194 in the U.S., compared with $46 in England and $110 in Canada. Nexium runs at about $215 in the U.S., compared with $60 in Switzerland and just $23 in the Netherlands, according to the IFHP report. Both drugs now face generic competition, so less costly options are available in the U.S.