Frequent Aspirin Use Tied to Lower Cervical Ca Risk

http://www.medpagetoday.com/

A comparison of established risk factors for cervical cancer showed that women who developed cervical cancer were more likely to be current smokers, smoke more cigarettes per day, and smoke for more years than women who did not develop cervical cancer. They were also more likely to become pregnant before the age of 21, have more than five children, and report long-term use of oral contraceptives than women who did not develop cervical cancer.

Cases were also more likely than controls to be white, obese, and lack a high school diploma.
The study had some limitations, most notably that patients were enrolled from 1982-1998 and use of aspirin and NSAIDs has increased significantly since then so the results may not apply to current patient populations…

“Moreover, our findings are similar to those of randomized trials,” the authors added. “Based on our findings related to aspirin, coupled with its low cost and wide availability globally, we encourage future research on the role of daily, long-term use of aspirin and acetaminophen as cervical cancer chemopreventive agents and enhancement to standard treatment strategies post-diagnosis.”

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Warrants not required for police to get your cell phone cell-site records

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/05/warrants-not-required-for-police-to-get-your-cell-phone-cell-site-records/

The majority ruling by Judge Frank Hull is a big boost to the government. Warrantless cell-site tracking has become among the government’s preferred methods of electronically tracking suspects in the wake of a 2012 Supreme Court ruling that the authorities generally needed a warrant to attach GPS devices onto vehicles and track their every move…

But what a different a larger panel of judges makes when it comes to deciding the constitutionality of so-called § 2703(d) orders:

The stored telephone records produced in this case, and in many other criminal cases, serve compelling governmental interests. Historical cell tower location records are routinely used to investigate the full gamut of state and federal crimes…

Such evidence is particularly valuable during the early stages of an investigation, when the police lack probable cause…

DEA to traveler: Thanks, I’ll take that cash

http://www.pharmaciststeve.com/?p=10289

All the money – $16,000 in cash – that Joseph Rivers said he had saved and relatives had given him to launch his dream in Hollywood is gone, seized during his trip out West not by thieves but by Drug Enforcement Administration agents during a stop at the Amtrak train station in Albuquerque… Rivers, 22, wasn’t detained and has not been charged with any crime since his money was taken last month.

That doesn’t matter. Under a federal law enforcement tool called civil asset forfeiture, he need never be arrested or convicted of a crime for the government to take away his cash, cars or property – and keep it. Agencies like the DEA can confiscate money or property if they have a hunch, a suspicion, a notion that maybe, possibly, perhaps the items are connected with narcotics. Or something else illegal. Or maybe the fact that the person holding a bunch of cash is a young black man is good enough…

A DEA agent boarded the train at the Albuquerque Amtrak station and began asking various passengers, including Rivers, where they were going and why. When Rivers replied that he was headed to LA to make a music video, the agent asked to search his bags. Rivers complied. Rivers was the only passenger singled out for a search by DEA agents – and the only black person on his portion of the train, Pancer said…

“I even allowed him to call my mother, a military veteran and (hospital) coordinator, to corroborate my story,” Rivers said. “Even with all of this, the officers decided to take my money because he stated that he believed that the money was involved in some type of narcotic activity.” 

Rivers was left penniless, his dream deferred. “These officers took everything that I had worked so hard to save and even money that was given to me by family that believed in me,” Rivers said in his email. “I told (the DEA agents) I had no money and no means to survive in Los Angeles if they took my money. They informed me that it was my responsibility to figure out how I was going to do that.” …

DEA agents may choose to ask the person whether his or her possessions can be searched in what is called a “consensual encounter.” If the subject refuses, the bags – but not the person – can be held until a search warrant is obtained, he said. Waite said that he could not provide exact figures on how often seizures occur in Albuquerque but that last week the DEA had five “consensual encounters” that resulted in seizures…

Whatever is seized is held during an internal administrative process (read: not public) while a case is made to connect the property to narcotics. Subjects can file a claim to have the items returned – and then they wait, sometimes forever.

While travelers like Rivers still have to worry about DEA agents, state and local law enforcement in New Mexico no longer has these virtually unlimited seizure powers. Five days before Rivers’ encounter in Albuquerque, Gov. Susana Martinez signed into law a bill that bars state and local law enforcement from seizing money or property under civil asset forfeiture. The law takes effect in July.

But the new state law won’t supersede the federal law, meaning federal agencies such as the DEA are still free to take your cash on arguably the flimsiest of legal grounds…

Prince To Perform In Baltimore In Wake Of Freddie Gray’s Death

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/06/prince-to-perform-in-balt_n_7219114.html

The Grammy award-winning musician will hold his “Rally 4 Peace” show on Mother’s Day along with his backing band 3RDEYEGIRL, Royal Farms Arena said in a statement on Tuesday night. The statement added that “superstar guests” were also expected to attend.

“Wear something gray,” reads a promotional image for the concert, seemingly to reference Freddie Gray, who died last month after a week in the hospital following his April 12 arrest…

Escaping from the Dark

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-cooke/escaping-from-the-dark_b_7174720.html

By:  Matthew Cooke and Adrian Grenier
How To Make Money Selling Drugs

As many already know, we are in the final months of a new documentary feature film called The Survivors Guide to Prison– an investigative report on the world’s largest “corrections” system…

On Saturday April 18th we joined forces with our partner Bryn Mooser of RYOT.org and unveiled a Virtual Reality experience of what it’s like to be in solitary confinement aka “the hole” at Tribeca Interactive in NYC.

People who paid to see the latest in entertainment media got to do something I never thought I’d see in my lifetime. We put on a pair of VR goggles on people’s heads and transported them into a scary-as-hell 7 x 9 foot cell with no windows, a concrete slab for a bed and no way out for 23 hours a day.

There in that virtual reality people found out that over 80,000 Americans — some as young as 13 years old are also here in “the hole.” There are no rules for this. You could just piss off a guard, fail a drug test or be in danger of getting beaten up — you could do literally anything or nothing and find yourself in the hole…

Having experienced this little taste, nobody was surprised that spending time in the hole leads to massive mental health issues, increases the likelihood you will commit suicide by 500 percent and most useless of all — that you’re actually more likely to commit a crime (whether or not you ever committed one in the first place) after you’ve been thrown in solitary…