Neurontin and Lyrica are a Death Sentence for New Brain Synapses

http://www.pharmaciststeve.com/?p=10158

These blockbuster drugs were approved for use even though the FDA had no idea what they actually did in the brain. A shocking new study shows that they block the formation of new brain synapses, drastically reducing the potential for rejuvenating brain plasticity – meaning that these drugs will cause brain decline faster than any substance known to mankind…

The researchers in the above study try to downplay the serious nature of the drugs by saying “adult neurons don’t form many new synapses.” That is simply not true. The new science is showing that brain health during aging relies on the formation of new synapses…

There’s no reason to be so alarmist about Lyrica and Neurontin.  Yes, patients need to be informed about the history of these drugs, especially since doctors don’t know how they work. In fact, one doctor who wanted to prescribe Lyrica for me told me it was an antidepressant, which of course is not true…

http://www.webmd.com/fibromyalgia/guide/lyrica-for-fibromyalgia-treatment

Lyrica is not an antidepressant. Rather, it is a drug that targets nerve signals. The medicine has long been used to relieve nerve pain in patients with shingles and diabetic neuropathy. It is also used to treat partial seizures.

Fibromyalgia pain is believed to be brought on by nerve-related changes, which cause nerve cells to fire off too many signals. This renders a person overly sensitive to stimuli that are normally not painful.

Scientists aren’t exactly sure how Lyrica improves fibromyalgia symptoms, but laboratory research suggests Lyrica helps decrease the number of nerve signals, and as a result calms down overly sensitive nerve cells. This appears to alleviate pain in patients with fibromyalgia…

Since we don’t know that much about fibromyalgia, these drugs may help because they are providing something that those who suffer from fibromyalgia don’t have.  Maybe helping to quiet the over-stimulation of their nervous system.  Of course, a lot of the success for Lyrica in fibromyalgia patients may be part of a placebo effect, but nobody knows.

However, if a doctor wants to prescribe Lyrica off-label, say for General Anxiety Disorder, then that doctor is just guessing that the drug may help.  And I just don’t think patients should be used as lab rats.  After all, the goal of Big Pharma is to make money, not help patients.  Big Pharma loves to expand the use of each drug it sells, maybe even creating illnesses which don’t exist or aren’t as prevalent as they’d like you to believe…

http://www.pharmafile.com/news/lyrica-challenge-antidepressants-new-anxiety-disorder-approval

Lyrica (pregabalin) was first launched in 2004 for the treatment of neuropathic pain and the control of epileptic seizures, but Pfizer can now tap into the GAD market after receiving European marketing approval.

Drug treatment of GAD has been traditionally dominated by antidepressants such as fluoxetine and GSK’s Seroxat, but Pfizer believes its drug offers some unique benefits over existing treatments…

The problem with antidepressants is that no one knows how they work either, yet they are prescribed (especially for women) as if they’re a wonder drug.  Turns out the FDA approval of antidepressants was based on studies provided and paid for by — you guessed it — Big Pharma. And the research the FDA approval was based on didn’t include all the studies that showed no benefit and/or harm.  The FDA doesn’t perform its own studies, but uses these cherry-picked, industry studies which it apparently believes.

APD officer booked into jail, charged with battery for use of force

http://krqe.com/2015/04/24/apd-officer-booked-into-jail-charged-with-battery-for-use-of-force/

ALBUQUERQUE (KRQE) – An Albuquerque police officer has been booked into the Metropolitan Detention Center, charged with misdemeanor aggravated battery for using force on someone during a call for service.

State Police say 24-year-old Cedric Greer was responding to a call at a motel when he struck the victim’s head several times with a closed fist, then struck and bruised that person’s chest. Witnesses reported that person was not resisting…

Makes you think twice about calling the police.

How Much Would You Pay for an Old Drug? If You Have MS, a Fortune

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-04-24/health-the-price-of-multiple-sclerosis-drugs-only-goes-up

When the first therapies to treat MS were approved in the 1990s, they cost $8,000 to $12,000 a year. Subsequent drugs entered the market with higher prices. The competition didn’t drive down cost, as Economics 101 would predict. Instead, the prices of the older drugs increased and rose several times faster than the overall rate at which drug costs increased…

Now all the MS drugs cost between $50,000 and $65,000 a year, including the ones that went for less than $10,000 when they made their debut…