But You Look Good: Living With Disbelief of Invisible Illness and Pain

http://princessinthetower.org/but-you-look-so-good-living-with-invisible-chronic-illness-and-pain/

It’s already tough enough dealing with pain and illness, without the added burden of disbelief…

9/28/2011, The Challenges of Living with Invisible Pain or Illness

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/turning-straw-gold/201109/the-challenges-living-invisible-pain-or-illness

Illness-related pain and debilitating fatigue are not cured by engaging in strenuous exercise, although I’ve read many accounts of doctors who have prescribed this very treatment. This lack of understanding from the medical community can have serious, even fatal, consequences because we may become gun-shy about seeing a doctor when a new symptom appears—one that could be a sign of a life-threatening medical problem, unrelated to our current illness…

Lastly, we face misunderstanding over what it means to be disabled. Just because we’re too sick to work and be active for extended periods doesn’t mean we can’t sometimes go out to a restaurant or have people over. This misunderstanding can have tragic consequences. I’ve read about people who’ve had their long-term disability payments revoked because an investigator who was sent to check up on them saw them being active in some way, perhaps going to the store…

Coping with Chronic Illness & Pain? The #1 Tip I’ve Found

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/living-the-questions/201312/coping-chronic-illness-pain-the-1-tip-ive-found

The author has a chronic health condition and had gone through similar soul searching. She writes, “I searched my psyche for feelings and thoughts that needed to be healed. I prayed to increase my faith…I read book after book, until I had a bookcase filled top to bottom with answers, none of which seemed to miraculously fix what I envisioned as broken…

Of course, I know this. Yeah, I’m human. We’re all human. But somehow, reading the words of these inspiring authors, hit me in a profound way. I didn’t cause this. I didn’t wake up one day and say, “Hey, I think I’ll spend the next seven or eight years going to doctors, having surgeries and taking pills.” I think far worse than the pain has been the questioning of my sanity…

Brainy quotes for “Invisible”

“War destroys people’s souls. Most people focus on physical injuries, but the invisible injuries can take a lifetime to heal and affects the lives of generations to come.”  Emmanuel Jal

“Vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others.”  Jonathan Swift

“I was standing right behind Marilyn, completely invisible, when she sang ‘Happy birthday, Mr. President.’ And indeed, the corny thing happened: Her dress split for my benefit, and there was Marilyn, and yes, indeed, she didn’t wear any underwear.”  Mike Nichols

“The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible.”  Oscar Wilde

“The sky is filled with stars, invisible by day.”  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil.” William Shakespeare

“An atheist is a man who has no invisible means of support.”  James Buchan

“Love is a force more formidable than any other. It is invisible – it cannot be seen or measured, yet it is powerful enough to transform you in a moment, and offer you more joy than any material possession could.”  Barbara de Angelis

“Chronic pain is a force more formidable than any other.  It is invisible — it cannot be seen or measured, yet it is powerful enough to transform and disable you, giving you more sorrow than anything else in your life.”  Painkills2

This Woman Is Live-Tweeting Her Quest To Have An Orgasm While On Antidepressants

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/30/orgasm-antidepressants-quest-crista-anne_n_6581494.html

Crista Anne’s inability to reach orgasm while on antidepressants isn’t uncommon.

“You need neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin [to have an orgasm],” Lauren F. Streicher, M.D., author of Sex Rx , told HuffPost. “What happens is that the same neurotransmitters impact depression. So if you look at the most common antidepressants, what they’re doing is altering your body’s levels of dopamine and serotonin, which has an impact on libido and the ability to orgasm.”

Streicher told HuffPost that orgasm comes back for 30 percent of people after about three or four months on antidepressants, and if it doesn’t, she suggests talking to a doctor about switching to a different drug or lowering the dose…