http://nationalpainreport.com/miss-understood-starving-people-with-disability-cases-8825496.html

Coonhound says:  Generally I agree w/ BL. If someone can go back to work they don’t need and shouldn’t quality for SSDI. By filing, you aren’t saying your doctor said you SHOULDNT work, you are stating that you CANNOT work and they DO mean ANY job in the national economy.

Any job in the “national economy,” huh?  So, should we call Amazon’s staffing agency and say we have millions of chronic pain patients who have been denied disability but are ready to go to work in the closest Amazon warehouse?  How about a job where you’re on your feet all day, like a Walmart cashier?

BL says:  When someone is not able to work because of their disabilities, they are not able to work period. If they are able to go back to work because they can’t afford to wait for their hearing any longer, then they are able to work. SSDI & SSI is for those who cannot work period… If your pain is so severe that you can’t concentrate, but you play computer games, that is inconsistent. Claimants don’t realize that the same activity required to work are also required to do countless other every day things.

When women entered the workforce, they didn’t get jobs — they got second jobs.  As a “homemaker,” you don’t get a pay check, benefits, or paid time off.  You are at the mercy of your husband, who may or may not provide for your future.  Who knows, your husband may divorce you and have to provide for other wives and kids… but, I digress.

As a chronic pain patient, the majority of your time is spent managing and dealing with the constant pain — along with all the time (and money) it takes to initially and continually prove your pain and disability.  (Shout out to Unum.)

There’s also the time involved in keeping up on the latest research, along with what’s happening in the drug war.  There’s the time spent going from doctor to doctor and pharmacy to pharmacy (or dispensary).  There’s time spent planning your days, abandoning those plans when the pain takes over, and then rescheduling those plans.  There’s days of no sleep and time spent distracting yourself from suicidal thoughts.  There’s time spent recovering from your latest physical activity, and time spent crying where no one can see or hear you.

Yes, being a chronic pain patient is a full-time job — and just like being a homemaker, there are no benefits and no time off, along with very little pay (if you consider disability income as “pay”).

So, when I see a comment like this:

BL said:  When someone is not able to work because of their disabilities, they are not able to work period. If they are able to go back to work because they can’t afford to wait for their hearing any longer, then they are able to work

I get a little upset.  I cannot imagine how many pain patients there are in this country that have never had insurance — which is something you need to “prove” your disabled.  Without thousand-dollar tests and a history of expensive medical treatments, millions of pain patients are forced to work.  They are forced to work because they have to eat and they enjoy having a roof over their heads.

Only someone who has never been hungry or homeless (or close to it) could make such a blanket statement — disabled people “are not able to work period.”

BL said:  If your pain is so severe that you can’t concentrate, but you play computer games, that is inconsistent. Claimants don’t realize that the same activity required to work are also required to do countless other every day things.

Oh, please.  Computer games would qualify as a distraction from the pain, not proof that you’re able to hold down a 40-hour-a-week job.

And the same activity “required to work” is also the same activity required to live.  The disabled do not have to stop living just because they cannot work.

The every-day things that disabled people are able to accomplish without assistance should be applauded — not used to shame them into returning to work.

For a disabled, chronic pain patient, returning to work is like taking on another job — and it’s a ticket to an even earlier grave.  Come to think of it, maybe that wouldn’t be so bad… After all, it’s not illegal to kill yourself by working to death.

And I’ll just point out that there are many disabled people who choose to commit suicide when faced with homelessness and no access to treatment — is that the solution?

3 thoughts on “Being a chronic pain patient is a full-time job

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